Skin Rejuvenation in Michigan

Would you like to learn more about skin rejuvenation that can take years off your look? Then plan to attend our

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Thursday, March 24 2011 from 3pm to 7pm at our Bloomfield Hills MI office

featuring specials on Botox, Juvederm, skin care products and peels.

Space is limited so call (855) 335-2700 today to reserve your appointment.

For more information, see our Michigan Skin Rejuvenation Specials.

The Importance of the Plastic Surgery Consultation

Are you considering breast augmentation, liposuction, a face lift or other plastic surgery procedure? Knowing what you want is important, but being prepared is crucial! Your questions about our services, the procedure, your recovery and easy financing options will all be answered at your initial consultation.

Michigan plastic surgeon M. A. Ali on the importance of the consultation.

10 Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Predictions for 2011

New York, NY – The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS), the leading national organization of board-certified plastic surgeons who specialize in cosmetic surgery, offers its predictions for cosmetic surgery in 2011.

Predictions are based on interviews with leading plastic surgeons around the country, who are actively involved in cutting edge surgical and non surgical aesthetic/cosmetic technology.
•As the economy continues to improve, demand for facelifts and other facial rejuvenation surgery will increase. Non-surgical facial rejuvenation procedures will also see some growth, but people who have been putting off surgery for the past few years because of the economy will be ready for the gold standard in facial rejuvenation in 2011.
•The growth and popularity of cosmetic injectables (Botox, Dysport, Sculptra, Radiesse, Evolence, Juvederm, Restylane, Perlane etc.) will continue to increase as products continue to evolve and new players enter the market.
•As our population increasingly realizes the dangers and health consequences of obesity, the number of patients seeking plastic surgery procedures for body contouring after dramatic weight loss (abdominoplasty, lower body lift, upper arm lift, etc.) will rise in 2011.
•As the baby boomer generation continues to age, so do their breast implants. This year many baby boomer women who have aging implants and/or breast ptosis will replace their implants and have breast lifts.
•Consumers looking for a bargain on cosmetic procedures will unfortunately lead to an increase in horror stories about “discount injectables” bought offshore and cosmetic medicine and cosmetic surgical procedures performed by untrained or poorly trained practitioners.
•While liposuction (lipoplasty) will continue to be the gold-standard in fat reduction, there will be continued interest in experimental techniques for non-invasive fat removal (freezing, zapping, lasering, etc.) as a future alternative or adjunct to liposuction (lipoplasty) surgery.
•Aesthetic Medicine has seen a dramatic increase in the diversity of the patients treated over the past decade and this trend is expected to continue to grow stronger than ever, with applications that cater to all people. The appeal of both aesthetic surgery and cosmetic medicine will continue to spread across the spectrum of our population, as plastic surgeons further tailor treatments to meet the sometimes unique needs of that expanding population.
•As the popularity of non surgical and minimally invasive procedures continues to grow, surgeons and manufacturers will develop new techniques and products that advance the science, produce even better results and lessen recovery time.
•Celebrities like Kim Kardashian, Beyonce, and Jennifer Lopez have made a shapely rear-end a must have accessory. In the coming year patients will be seeking posterior body lifts, buttock lifts, surgical and nonsurgical buttock augmentations to shape and augment their buttocks.
•Following the trend in increased consumer sophistication patients will increasingly want to know if the latest procedure and device being touted on the internet and TV talk show really works and if it is safe. By incorporating evidence-based medicine into the core specialties of plastic surgery, the Aesthetic Society will make it easier for both doctors and patients to determine fact from fiction.
About ASAPS
The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS), is recognized as the world’s leading organization devoted entirely to aesthetic plastic surgery and cosmetic medicine of the face and body. ASAPS is comprised of over 2,600 Plastic Surgeons; active members are certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery (USA) or by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and have extensive training in the complete spectrum of surgical and non-surgical aesthetic procedures. International active members are certified by equivalent boards of their respective countries. All members wNew York, NY – The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS), the leading national organization of board-certified plastic surgeons who specialize in cosmetic surgery, offers its predictions for cosmetic surgery in 2011.

Predictions are based on interviews with leading plastic surgeons around the country, who are actively involved in cutting edge surgical and non surgical aesthetic/cosmetic technology.
•As the economy continues to improve, demand for facelifts and other facial rejuvenation surgery will increase. Non-surgical facial rejuvenation procedures will also see some growth, but people who have been putting off surgery for the past few years because of the economy will be ready for the gold standard in facial rejuvenation in 2011.
•The growth and popularity of cosmetic injectables (Botox, Dysport, Sculptra, Radiesse, Evolence, Juvederm, Restylane, Perlane etc.) will continue to increase as products continue to evolve and new players enter the market.
•As our population increasingly realizes the dangers and health consequences of obesity, the number of patients seeking plastic surgery procedures for body contouring after dramatic weight loss (abdominoplasty, lower body lift, upper arm lift, etc.) will rise in 2011.
•As the baby boomer generation continues to age, so do their breast implants. This year many baby boomer women who have aging implants and/or breast ptosis will replace their implants and have breast lifts.
•Consumers looking for a bargain on cosmetic procedures will unfortunately lead to an increase in horror stories about “discount injectables” bought offshore and cosmetic medicine and cosmetic surgical procedures performed by untrained or poorly trained practitioners.
•While liposuction (lipoplasty) will continue to be the gold-standard in fat reduction, there will be continued interest in experimental techniques for non-invasive fat removal (freezing, zapping, lasering, etc.) as a future alternative or adjunct to liposuction (lipoplasty) surgery.
•Aesthetic Medicine has seen a dramatic increase in the diversity of the patients treated over the past decade and this trend is expected to continue to grow stronger than ever, with applications that cater to all people. The appeal of both aesthetic surgery and cosmetic medicine will continue to spread across the spectrum of our population, as plastic surgeons further tailor treatments to meet the sometimes unique needs of that expanding population.
•As the popularity of non surgical and minimally invasive procedures continues to grow, surgeons and manufacturers will develop new techniques and products that advance the science, produce even better results and lessen recovery time.
•Celebrities like Kim Kardashian, Beyonce, and Jennifer Lopez have made a shapely rear-end a must have accessory. In the coming year patients will be seeking posterior body lifts, buttock lifts, surgical and nonsurgical buttock augmentations to shape and augment their buttocks.
•Following the trend in increased consumer sophistication patients will increasingly want to know if the latest procedure and device being touted on the internet and TV talk show really works and if it is safe. By incorporating evidence-based medicine into the core specialties of plastic surgery, the Aesthetic Society will make it easier for both doctors and patients to determine fact from fiction.
About ASAPS
The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS), is recognized as the world’s leading organization devoted entirely to aesthetic plastic surgery and cosmetic medicine of the face and body. ASAPS is comprised of over 2,600 Plastic Surgeons; active members are certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery (USA) or by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and have extensive training in the complete spectrum of surgical and non-surgical aesthetic procedures. International active members are certified by equivalent boards of their respective countries. All members worldwide adhere to a strict Code of Ethics and must meet stringent membership requirements.orldwide adhere to a strict Code of Ethics and must meet stringent membership requirements.

Limited training among some cosmetic surgery doctors worries state officials

Here is another article to remind us we should always know who is performing our cosmetic procedures and make sure they are truly qualified. Don’t be fooled by “paid for” board certifications. Plastic Surgery should be performed by a physician who is Board Certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery and a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

By Letitia Stein, Times Staff Writer

TAMPA — A Tampa doctor accused of allowing unlicensed assistants to perform liposuction should have his license suspended for a year and pay a $50,000 fine, the Florida Board of Medicine decided Saturday.

The board’s action was a move to address the growing concern about physicians with limited cosmetic surgery training working in medical spas.

Many patients don’t realize that popular cosmetic treatments, from laser hair removal to liposuction, can inflict serious harm. In an alarming case, a South Florida physician recently had to give up his license after a patient died following complications from a liposuction procedure.

Florida’s dermatologists and plastic surgeons urge patients to seek doctors with board certification in their specialties or at least formal, accredited education in the cosmetic procedure they’re offering. While some note that’s merely them protecting their business, experts agree it can take homework for patients to spot a physician who is ill-prepared to perform cosmetic treatments.

“For consumers, it’s a difficult situation,” said Dr. Steven Rosenberg, a West Palm Beach dermatologist on the board, noting the lack of regulation for many clinics doing cosmetic services. “We really have no idea what environment the medical spas are providing.”

The Tampa case, heard Saturday in Orlando, highlights some potential red flags:

The charges stemmed from a woman who came to Dr. Yves N. Jean-Baptiste for liposuction. Jean-Baptiste had trained and received board certification in family medicine. About two years ago, he began to perform cosmetic procedures at his north Tampa practice, YJB Medical and Weight Clinics, after completing a three-day “intensive, hands-on training course” in Weston, according to his attorney.

Jean-Baptiste said he performed more than 250 liposuction procedures, his attorney noted without serious complication. But the July 2009 case illuminated his safety breaches.

State health officials said Jean-Baptiste allowed two people unlicensed to practice medicine to perform liposuction on the patient, identified as D.S. Her medical records didn’t show a proper exam before the procedure, how much anesthesia was used, or the amount of fat removed. And Jean-Baptiste hadn’t registered his office, then on Gunn Highway, as a surgical facility as required.

The physician declined to comment, but he disputes the charge that his assistants performed the liposuction, according to information his attorney presented.

Through his attorney, Jean-Baptiste acknowledged the employees he called surgical technicians were unlicensed medical assistants and his poor medical record keeping.

The patient did not appear to suffer lasting harm. Her complaint followed a billing dispute, noted the doctor’s attorney, Jon Pellett of Tampa. In a letter to the doctor’s office discussing a refund, she said she planned to return for back liposuction and was “truly pleased with the work done by everyone in your office and could not be happier with the results!!”

But members of the board of medicine were not impressed.

“I think he’s in a lot of trouble because he doesn’t have a surgical background,” said Dr. Trina Espinola, a St. Petersburg surgeon on the board, which moved to increase the recommended fine from $10,000 to $50,000.

“This is really scary,” Brigitte Goersch, an Orlando businesswomen and consumer member of the board, said while rejecting claims that the fines were excessive. “If you want to practice medicine again, then you need to do it safely for the citizens of Florida. I would suggest that you be happy this is what the discussion is.”

After a one-year suspension of his license, Jean-Baptiste would face three years of probation, during which he would require some supervision. His license is currently suspended under emergency orders. He must now decide whether to accept the board’s discipline or seek a trial before an administrative law judge, his attorney said.

This kind of case underscores how a weekend of coursework doesn’t prepare physicians to perform procedures such as liposuction, said Chris Nuland, a Jacksonville attorney representing Florida’s plastic surgeons and dermatologists. In recent years, he said they have grown concerned about the rise of untrained professionals, whose patients they end up treating when complications arise.

“Just like you wouldn’t want a psychiatrist doing your brain surgery, you need to wonder who is doing your (cosmetic) surgery,” he said. “What is their training, and is this because it is a cash business, or because it’s what they have been trained to do their entire careers?”

Cosmetic Surgery No Longer Subject of Taboo

Dec 16, 2010 /NewsRelease/ – The generation of peace, love, and change embarks on the main telecomutting saves gas as the oldest from the baby boomer generation turns 65 January, 1, 2011. Marked rich in divorce rates, competition in the work place by millennials, and the emergence of the “cougar”, the baby boomer generation has changed the bend on aging unlike previous generations.

In 2009, the American Academy of Plastic surgery reported over 17 million cosmetic procedures performed in the usa, the majority of which contributed through the aging baby boomer population. Top procedures reported amongst baby boomers included: blepharoplasty, liposuction, abdominoplasty, and anti-aging treatments such as Botox.

These alarming numbers in cosmetic surgery impact not only baby boomer aging habits, but alter the standard of cosmetic surgery from a once subject of taboo for an accepted aging preventative for proceeding generations.

Men and Women are Spending More and More to Eliminate Signs of Aging as the Economy Improves

New Data Reveals Plastic Surgery Spending is Rebounding with a Continuing Demand for Cosmetic Procedures as 2011 Approaches

Tampa, FL (Vocus) December 13, 2010

Each year, millions of Americans invest in cosmetic procedures to gain a renewed sense of confidence and feel their best. However, as the economy experienced a dramatic downturn in 2009, so did plastic surgery spending, which fell 20 percent across the country, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS). Now, fresh data provided by the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) show more and more people are spending on nips and tucks. The AAFPRS states the number of non-invasive cosmetic procedures rose 47 percent in 2010 with further increases expected in 2011.

On the national level, the latest data from the AAFPRS showed 77 percent of physicians agree patients are more educated about plastic surgery options. The AAFPRS states that “With more people wanting to look younger, feel better and take an active role in their health, patients are researching different physicians and treatments to find the best one suited to meet their personal needs.” The AAFPRS survey concluded that the overall rise in these procedures pointed to more patients trusting their face to facial plastic surgeons that are trained and focus solely on the face and neck. “Because of this,” according to the study, “patients are seeing better outcomes.”

No matter what a potential patient’s procedure of choice is the best advice is always to seek out a surgeon who is highly qualified, trained and experienced in performing that particular procedure to ensure the best possible outcome and a high level of satisfaction. It is also important that a doctor is down-to-earth and that a patient can feel like they can connect with them. Good communication between the doctor and patient is paramount in achieving a customized result.

Do Plastic Surgery procedures pose a problem with the New Full Body airport Scanners?

Most of us have heard about the new Full Body Scanners being used at several airports and the controversy surrounding this hot topic. The arguments range from concerns about privacy to health issues. Here is another question: Will this new technology pose problems for those travelers who have had any type of plastic surgery procedure? Are there any procedures that could pose a problem? This issue hasn’t been discussed but should it? Articles are being written continuously about this hot topic…

“Among the issues debated:
•Processing times. The TSA says it takes about 20 seconds to screen a passenger with the machines.
The International Air Transportation Association, which represents 250 of the world’s airlines, disputes that. The group says it observed the new machines at Baltimore/Washington airport during the July 4 holiday weekend, and it took 50 to 70 seconds to screen a passenger.
Frequent flier Jim Zipursky of Omaha says it took 2½ to five minutes to screen him with the new machine before each of four recent flights from Omaha’s airport. On previous flights, it took a minute or less to walk through a magnetometer, he says.
•Privacy invasion. Full-body machines violate the Fourth Amendment, which guards against unlawful searches and seizures, by subjecting travelers to an “invasive search” without any suspicion that they did anything wrong, the Electronic Privacy Information Center alleges in a July 2 lawsuit filed in a U.S. appeals court in Washington. The non-profit group was established to focus attention on civil liberties issues.
The group also says the machines perform digital strip searches that are incompatible with the teachings of some religious faiths.
Dubai airport security officials announced July 5 that the machines contradict Islam and wouldn’t be installed there because of privacy concerns. Orthodox Jews and Pope Benedict XVI have also opposed the machines.
The TSA says it sets the machines to blur travelers’ facial features and places employees viewing the images in a separate room. The agency says it doesn’t store the images and deletes them after viewing.
•Radiation. Frequent flier Richard Hofrichter of Glen Allen, Va., says he’s been screened by the full-body machines about 30 times this year, and he’s worried about the cumulative effects of radiation.
TSA spokeswoman Kristin Lee says the machines that use high-speed X-rays emit a very low dose of radiation, equal to the amount received from the environment during two minutes in flight. Other machines that use electromagnetic waves that emit energy to scan passengers are “thousands of times less than what is permitted for a cellphone,” she says.
The TSA says machines that use X-rays were evaluated by the government and scientists who determined that the radiation doses for individuals being screened, operators and bystanders were well below the dose limits specified by the American National Standards Institute.
In April, however, four professors at the University of California-San Francisco, wrote a letter to John Holdren, President Obama’s top science adviser, expressing “serious concerns” about “potential health risks” from the machines. The professors are experts in biochemistry, biophysics, X-ray imaging and cancer.
The radiation emitted by the scanners would be safe if it was distributed throughout the entire body, but the majority is absorbed by the skin and underlying tissue, the professors wrote. “The dose to the skin may be dangerously high,” they said.
They told Holdren that “there is good reason to believe” the machines would increase the risk of cancer to children, the elderly, pregnant women and others prone to cancer.
David Brenner, the director of Columbia University’s radiological research center, says the machines emit very small doses of radiation to the skin. The risk to individuals may be small, Brenner says, but with hundreds of millions of passengers flying each year, “The population risk has the potential to be significant.”
•Ability to detect weapons and explosives. The Government Accountability Office said in March that it “remains unclear” whether the machines would have detected the explosives in the underwear of a man who allegedly tried to blow up a Northwest Airlines jet bound for Detroit on Christmas Day.
Brian Sullivan and Steve Elson, two former Federal Aviation Administration security agents, say the machines are ineffective for finding explosives and preventing a terrorist from smuggling explosives on board an aircraft.
Billie Vincent, the FAA’s former security director, says the machines “incrementally improve” on metal detectors if TSA agents alertly resolve identified threats. There are no screening technologies that “are 100% effective,” he says.
TSA spokeswoman Lee says the agency is “highly confident” in the detection capability of full-body, or advanced, imaging technology. “While there is no silver-bullet technology, advanced imaging technology is very effective at detecting metallic and non-metallic threats on passengers, including explosives and powders,” she says.
Passengers with concerns about the machines can instead request a pat-down search.” By Gary Stoller, USA TODAY
As we see, there are several concerns being debated out there, but should plastic surgery effects on screening be one of them? The doctor is going to be researching this topic and looking into whether there are any procedures that could pose a problem for travelers opting for the new full body scan. Find out in the second installment regarding this issue

The use of Facial Fillers on the rise as alternative to plastic surgery

Lynn Shapiro, 59, of Bridgeton, N.J., has no idea how much she has spent on twice-a-year facial injectables in the past few years, and she’s not interested in finding out. She just knows that she likes the way she looks and is thrilled about the way she feels. “Whatever I’m spending,” she says, “it’s worth it.”
Baby boomers received more than 1.1 million injections of Botox and hyaluronic acid in 2009, a 15 percent increase over the year before, according to the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, and the trend shows no signs of slowing.

The generation whose mantra could be “50 is the new 30” does not intend to grow old gracefully. It doesn’t want to age the way its parents did, and it doesn’t have to. In the past eight years, a new field of cosmetic medicine has emerged, focused on fillers and injections and giving anyone with a credit card the option of looking younger and more refreshed without going under the knife.

But it can be costly. Injectables such as Restylane, Juvederm and Radiesse range from $345 to $800 a syringe, depending on the doctor. And they last only six to nine months before a redo is needed.

“When you add it up over time, it can be more than the cost of a surgical procedure,” says Scott Bartlett, professor of surgery at the University of Pennsylvania and chief of pediatric plastic surgery at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

In Shapiro’s case, the desire for facial rejuvenation arose in 2002, shortly after she recovered from a serious operation to remove a growth from her spine.

“When I learned it was not malignant, I began to look at life differently,” she says. “I wanted to do the things that would make me feel better and enjoy myself more.”

Since then, she has had countless injections with facial fillers to treat depressions under her eyes and chin, and with Botox to erase the lines in her forehead. In February, she had blepharoplasty to remove excess fat from her upper eyelids.

“The skin over my eyes was droopy and made me always look tired or angry,” Shapiro says. “I was neither.”

Blepharoplasty is the most common cosmetic surgical procedure performed on baby boomers, ahead of face-lifts and liposuction. There were 70,218 done last year, down from 91,806 in 2008, according to ASAPS. Experts say the trend is due to the dismal economy and the rising use of fillers, injections and skin-tightening lasers.

“In today’s times, when people can’t afford to be away from work for long, alternatives to blepharoplasty are more attractive,” plastic surgeon Kevin Cross says.

Still, eyelid surgeries are here to stay, he says.

Cross is medical director of Deme, a glitzy aesthetic center with locations in Center City and Devon that assembles specialists in cosmetic surgery, dentistry, skin care, nutrition and mental health.

But it is not just plastic surgeons who specialize in injecting facial fillers and Botox. Dermatologists, internists, general practitioners and ophthalmologists do it, too. The administering of fillers is a lucrative business that caters to men and women who crave instant youth. They are willing to pay for it out of pocket, as insurance rarely covers the procedures. Shapiro’s fillers and eye surgery were done by Marc Cohen, who is board-certified in ophthalmology and cosmetic surgery. Cohen has offices in Voorhees and Bala Cynwyd.

“Eyelids are the most complicated and challenging part of the face on which to work,” Cohen says. “They are delicate structures, and the key is to achieve a look that is natural, attractive and preserves function.”

Over the years, Cohen says, the approach has changed significantly. “Pick up any magazine and you’ll see that people look younger when they have fairly full upper eyelids, not the hollowed-out Marilyn Monroe look that people used to envision when they considered cosmetic eye surgery. So we remove less tissue than we used to and we use fillers – both under the brow and beneath the lower lids – to add volume and create those more youthful, sweeping curves.”

Fillers do not replace surgery, but they can often postpone it. Meanwhile, the plumping up of wrinkles and lines, creating cheekbones and voluptuous lips, can restore the sought-after look of days gone by. And for those without the sagging necks and bulging jowls that beg for face-lifts, fillers may be enough to satisfy them.

Twenty-five years ago, Penn’s Bartlett could not have imagined how dramatically the field of facial rejuvenation would change, he says. With the arsenal of techniques available today, he suggests consulting someone with “more than one club in his bag.”

“If you go to someone who does nothing but inject, that’s all he’ll be able to offer you,” he says. “A plastic surgeon who uses many different strategies and understands the anatomy of the face can tell you what’s best for you.”

Marianne Daria of Bryn Mawr is not quite a baby boomer, but at 43 she wants to get a head start against aging. Several times a year, she visits the Havertown office of internist Norbertus Robben, whose practice now is only cosmetic medicine. Patients say they receive pleasing results and modest prices.

Daria receives treatments with Botox and fillers and has had nonsurgical laser skin tightening. Fillers such as Restylane, Juvederm and Radiesse can range from $345 a syringe (Robben’s price) to $650 to $750 (Cross’ price) or even more. Skin-tightening treatments generally begin at over $1,000 depending on the type of treatment and who’s giving it.

Robben asks his patients to prioritize what bothers them most, and typically they’re on target, he says. Most often, they point out the nasal labial folds, the marionette crevices that run from the corners of the lips to the chin, the hollows under the eyes and the “smoker’s” lines above the lip – which all can be addressed with fillers. “If they are looking for more than what I can offer them, I’ll suggest they see a plastic surgeon,” Robben says.

Toni Rosen, 52, a French and Spanish teacher who lives in Bryn Mawr, doesn’t think she’s ready for plastic surgery and likes the results of the fillers she gets from Cross a couple of times a year. She has had the lines above her lips treated, as well as the depressions under her eyes and the deep folds between her nose and mouth.

If she remembers to stop taking her once-a-day baby aspirin a week before the procedure, she says, she experiences no bruising. Otherwise, she may have a minimal black-and-blue marking that lasts for three or four days. The numbing cream that is applied a half-hour before the procedure keeps her pain-free while Cross is injecting her.

“Every doctor has a different aesthetic sense,” Rosen says, “and Dr. Cross is a perfect fit for me.”

When Rosen first came to Deme in April 2008, she was also seen by Betsy Rubenstone, a licensed aesthetician and director of Deme’s medical skin-care division. Since then, she has seen one of Rubenstone’s aestheticians for microdermabrasion and a laser treatment. Every day, she cares for her skin by using brightening exfoliation pads, a hydrating mask, a peel/bleach cream and a tinted moisturizer, all products Rubenstone prescribed for her.

“I like having healthy-looking skin,” she says, “but I won’t go to extremes. I’m putting my money into the fillers because I think they make such a difference. The guy behind the counter at the pizza place used to tell me I looked tired when I felt peppy and full of energy. Now I realize it was just that my face was losing volume and my cheeks were beginning to sink in. I’m going to go back there and see what he says now.”
By GLORIA HOCHMAN
For the Inquirer

Back To Basics

It’s the most basic steps in your skin care routine that really make a difference in your skin’s appearance.

Exfoliating is the most important step in your daily skin care regime because the skin is constantly re-growing and shedding. Dead skin cells that are not removed can block the skin from absorbing the nutrients in your treatment products and applying additional products to the face will just add to further clogging of the pores.

If the dead skin cells are not taken off it can lead to breakouts, blackheads, whiteheads, pimples and superficial spotting.

Exfoliating regularly reduces the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, keeps skin healthy. When pores are completely clean they will look the most refined, and the skin’s overall texture will be improved. We recommend doing a more advanced exfoliating treatment, such as the VI PEEL, three to four times a year.

Many exfoliating cleansers contain apricot pits or walnut shells to exfoliate the skin. These can actually scratch the skin, causing tiny tears. The best way to exfoliate regularly is to use a daily exfoliating wash or liquid exfoliant. These ingredients also stimulate new cell formation and increase cell circulation.

New to Amae’s product list is an extremely advanced one step treatment product, COMPLETE CARE, which also contains exfoliating ingredients, such as Glycolic Acid that work to maintain the results of the VI PEEL.

So, even if you’re not using an exfoliating wash or liquid serum, the exfoliating ingredients in the “COMPLETE CARE” product will help your skin to absorb the benefits of the ingredients in the product, without clogging the pores.

Give us a call to schedule your Vi Peel today, (248) 335.7200. www.drali.com

VI BLOG~Friday, Oct 1, 2010